Sharks do have special healing abilities. They often get wounds (due to mating rituals, combat, collisions with reef substrate or fishing gear) which, however, heal remarkably quickly. A part in it is the fact that dermal-denticles are teeth and are continually replaced like real teeth. Thus wounds are quickly covered with temporary, larger denticles, and the resulting scar become invisible by normal shaped denticles within 6 month.

An example of this was found in Scalloped hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna lewini). This species of Hammerhead sharks (also known as bronze, kidney-headed, or southern hammerhead sharks) lives all over the  world offshore in warm and tropical waters near the surface, partly in large schools. This and the fact that there are several distinct sub-populations makes this species highly susceptible to fishing pressure. They are caught  commercially for their meat and skin, but manly their fins, often illegally (IUU), as bycatch or as big game fish by recreational fishermen. That’s why they are worldwide considered endangered by the IUCN.

Hammerhead shark, Cocos Island, Costa Rica.jpg
Scalloped hammerhead by Barry PetersFlickr, CC BY 2.0, Link

Scalloped hammerheads are up to 14 ft – 4.3 m – long (but on average only up to 8.2 ft – 2.5 m – as female and 5.9 ft – 1.8 m – as male). They are viviparous (once the yolk sack is depleted it converts into a placental connection) and give birth after 9 to 12 month in specific, shallow nursery areas to up to 40 living young. The pups grow slowly and often fall prey to larger sharks, what explains the relative large litter size.

Sources: here, here and here

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