The Blacknose shark (Carcharhinus acronotus) is a little (up to 4.3 ft -1.3 m- long) requiem shark. Its name refers to a black spot on the nose of juvenile sharks.

Carcharhinus acronotus noaa.jpg
Carcharhinus acronotus by NOAA – http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2009/20090724_sharks.html, Public Domain, Link

Blacknose sharks live in tropical or warm-temperate coastal waters of the western Atlantic from the southern USA, through the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean all the way to southern Brazil. There is segregation by size and sex: juveniles are typically found in shallow water while adults are located at greater depths. They are known to form large schools.

Blacknose sharks reach a maximum age of 10-16 years for females and 4.5-9 years for males. Both mature at 2 years and are relatively fast growing. Reproduction is viviparous with a yolk-sac placenta. After a 8-11 month gestation period, 3-6 15 to 20 in -38 to 50 cm- long pups are born annually (Gulf of Mexico) or biennially (Northwestern Atlantic) in shallow nursery areas like coastal bays or mangrove swamps, for instance Bulls Bay, South Carolina (U.S.).

Blacknose sharks are fished commercially as target and bycatch, but also as game-fish – as they are deemed decent fighters. This species is considered Near Threatened globally by the IUCN, and benefits from conservation measures (together with other small coastal sharks) in US waters. Although affected by high fishing pressure, Blacknose sharks seem to be in no danger in Brazil (since there are enough mature sharks to be found) but there aren’t sufficient data yet. For the Caribbean, too.

Sources: here, here and here

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